New Sextortion Blackmail Campaign Launched Today (01.18.2019) [NSFW]

Date: 18 Jan 2019 Category : | Author: Graham Penrose

Today (18th January 2019) people have started receiving horrifying messages threatening to post video of their most intimate moments on the internet.

You may have arrived at this post because you received an email from a purported hacker who is demanding payment or else they will send compromising information — such as videos and pictures that are sexual in nature — to all your friends and family. You’re searching for what to do in this frightening situation. Don’t panic.

Contrary to the claims in your email, you haven’t been hacked (or at least, that’s not what prompted that email). This is merely a new variation on an old scam which is popularly being called “sextortion.” This is a type of online phishing that is targeting people around the world and preying off digital-age fears. (Paragraph 2-4 above extracted from EFF)

The first and foremost piece of advice is: do not pay the ransom.

The text of the latest disturbing scam is as follows:

“THIS IS NOT A JOKE – I AM DEAD SERIOUS!

Hi perv,

The last time you visited a p0rnographic website with teens, you downloaded and installed software I developed. My program has turned on your camera and recorded the process of your masturbation. My software has also downloaded all your email contact lists and a list of your friends on Facebook.

I have both the ‘Sales.mp4’ with your masturbation as well as a file with all your contacts on my hard drive. You are very perverted! If you want me to delete both the files and keep the secret, you must send me Bitcoin payment. I give you 72 hours for payment.

If you don’t know how to send Bitcoins, visit Google.

Send 2.000 USD to this Bitcoin address immediately:
3FMZ6AxjeGxZML998ZVtygC41SgFoSrk6g (copy and paste)

1 BTC = 3,580 USD right now, so send exactly 0.565719 BTC to the address provided above.

Do not try to cheat me!

As soon as you open this Email I will know you opened it.”

The Electronic Frontier Foundation offer plenty of advice on how to handle these situations. The simplest counter measure is to cover your camera and de-activate your microphone and take it from there.

Related Reading

Sextortion Scam: What to Do If You Get the Latest Phishing Spam Demanding Bitcoin
You may have arrived at this post because you received an email from a purported hacker who is demanding payment or else they will send compromising information—such as pictures sexual in nature—to all your friends and family. You’re searching for what to do in this frightening situation.Don’t panic. Contrary to the claims in your email, you haven’t been hacked (or at least, that’s not what prompted that email). This is merely a new variation on an old scam which is popularly being called “sextortion.” This is a type of online phishing that is targeting people around the world and preying off digital-age fears.We’ll talk about a few steps to take to protect yourself, but the first and foremost piece of advice we have: do not pay the ransom.

Bitcoin Abuse Database – Report history for 3FMZ6AxjeGxZML998ZVtygC41SgFoSrk6g
Hi perv, The last time you visited a p0rnographic website with teens, you downloaded and installed software I developed. My program has turned on your camera and recorded the process of your masturbation. My software has also downloaded all your email contact lists and a list of your friends on Facebook. I have both the ‘XXXXX.mp4’ with your masturbation as well as a file with all your contacts on my hard drive.

Tracking Transactions for a Bitcoin Address

Beware of Extortion Scams Stating They Have Video of You on Adult Sites
Once again, this is a scam, nothing has been installed on your computer, and they do not have any video of you doing anything. Therefore, do not be concerned if you receive one of these emails. At the same time, if the passwords sent in the email is one that you are currently using, I strongly suggest you change it immediately.

New Sextortion Scam Pretends to Come from Your Hacked Email Account
Sextortion scams are when an attacker sends emails to people stating that their computer is hacked and that the attackers have been recording the screen and webcam as the user visits adult sites. The scammers then blackmail the recipients by stating they will release the videos if they do not receive a payment in bitcoins. In the past, the sextortion emails would just include a target’s password that the attackers found from a data breach dump in order to scare the victim into thinking that the threats were real. Now the scammers are also pretending to have access to the target’s email account by spoofing the sender of the scam email to be the same email as the victim.

Sextortion Emails now Leading to Ransomware and Info-Stealing Trojans
Sextortion email scams have been a very successful way of generating money for criminals. A new Sextortion campaign is now taking it to the next level by tricking recipients into installing the Azorult information-stealing Trojan, which then downloads and installs the GandCrab ransomware. A sextortion scam is when you receive an email that states someone hacked your computer and has been creating videos of you while you are using adult web sites. These emails may also contain passwords of yours that were leaked during data breaches in order to make the scams look more legitimate.

Sextortion scam arrived at 1/18/2019 in Japan
From Twitter feed of ねこさん⚡🔜Ͷow or Ͷever🔙(ΦωΦ)@catnap707無課金ばらまきメールウォッチャー。ばらまきメール回収の会(仮称)。ときどき😺にゃんこ。 #ばらまき型メールカレンダー ⇒http://goo.gl/hFhjfm #不審メール RSSフィード⇒http://goo.gl/6cpvoh 猫を飼い始めました (ΦωΦ) #マンチカン の女の子♀アンです。

Beware sextortionists spoofing your own email address

Oh, no! A hacker (says he) planted a Trojan, (claims he) took over your computer’s camera and microphone, (purportedly) filmed you watching porn, (theoretically) has the password to your email account, and is threatening to forward the scandalous video to all your email and social media contacts unless you fork over Bitcoin!“ It must be true,” many people have unfortunately thought about this new twist on an established sextortion scam. After all, he’s (apparently) sending email from your very own email address!Good news: thankfully, it’s not true. The sextorting phisher has not, in fact, demonstrated that he’s hacked your email. All he’s done is demonstrate that anyone can send an email claiming to be from anyone else.

Email scam threatens to release video of people watching pornography if they don’t pay bitcoin ransom
People are being sent horrifying messages threatening to post video of their most intimate moments on the internet.What’s more, the messages are shockingly believable: they appear to include secret information about the recipient that suggests the threats are real.But in fact the messages are a scam. And they seem to be relying on the vast number of stolen passwords that are available across the internet.

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